" cyber attack "

Q3-Image

PandaLabs Q3 Results: Trojans exceed PUPs in the third quarter

The results for the third quarter show that malware continues to break records, averaging at 227 747 new samples created daily.

The last four months has seen large high profile organisations fall victim to cyber-attacks; companies such as JP Morgan Chase, Target, Home Depot and online services such as Dropbox and iCloud.

The most recent victim is Sony. The hack on the company led to upcoming films and workers’ personal data, such as social security numbers and salaries being leaked online. The malware used in the attack was undetectable by industry standard antivirus software and was damaging and unique enough to cause the FBI to release a flash alert to warn other international organisations of the critical threat.

Trojans continue to be the most common malware during Q3, accounting for 75% of infections, compared to 62.80% in the previous quarter. PUPs ranked second, representing 14.55%of infections, decreasing since Q2. Adware/spyware comprises 6.88% of infections, worms at 2.09% and viruses at 1.48% – down since the second quarter.

The global infection rate increased from 36.87% in Q2 to 37.93% in Q3. The results for each country shows that China is still at the top, reaching an infection rate of 49.83%. China is followed by Peru at 42.38% and Bolivia at 42.12%.

Europe remains the region with the lowest infection rate, with nine European countries ranking in the top ten most secure countries.

The full report is available here.

SA-Cyber-Safety

South Africa: Third-highest number of cybercrime victims in the world

Intel’s recent “Global Cost of Cyber-Crime Report” shows that the economic impact of cyber-crime in South Africa is equivalent to 0.14% of the country’s GDP. This is roughly R5.8 billion a year and growing.

According to security experts, neither government nor business are combatting cyber-crime correctly. This is mainly due to a shortage of skills and a lack of urgency in taking action against cybercriminals. Prevention is better than cure and South Africans must be made aware of these crimes and how to prevent them.

Industry reports indicate that South Africa has the third-highest number of cybercrime victims, after Russia and China. The most common cyber-attacks locally are related to phishing. “South Africa is the second most targeted country globally when it comes to Phishing attacks,” says Drew van Vuuren, CEO of information security and privacy practice, 4Di Privaca.

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Cybercrime

The Era of Cyber-crime – Don’t Fall Victim

There has been an increase in cyber-attacks on high profile companies recently – JP Morgan Chase, Target and Home Depot as well as breaches in online services such as iCloud, Dropbox and Snapchat.

A cyber-attack is defined as – any type of offensive action employed by individuals or whole organizations, that targets computer information systems.

With each new attack it’s increasingly clear, no company is immune to cyber-attacks and preparation is key to mitigating risk.  This preparation must start with a commitment at the very top of the company. With a top-down approach and directors who are actively engaged, companies stand a greater chance of protecting their shareholders’ interests in cyberspace.

The companies that are most often targeted are financial institutions, healthcare organisations, major retailers and online/cloud storage services.

The most recent attacks, used methods that are:

  • Sophisticated – exploiting weak points, using backdoor controls and advanced malware.
  • Social – targeting specific people with social engineering and stealing and using valid credentials.
  • Stealthy – implemented in a series of low profile moves that are undetectable to standard security or hidden among thousands of logs collected daily.

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Britain Beefs Up Cyber Security Measures

According to a recent report on Independent On-line (http://www.iol.co.za/scitech/technology/security) Britain is appealing to company investors and shareholders to adopt a “watchdog” role as a means of “beefing up” its cybersecurity. Rather than employing the more draconian US approach, which features mandatory reporting by companies subjected to cyber attacks, Britain is relying on those with vested interests to assist them in the management of such assaults.
The report suggests that 9 out of 10 British companies have “suffered a cyber breach in the past year” and, as such, the government is now viewing this problem as serious – so much so that it’s set aside £650m over the next four years to manage the situation.
However, despite the gravity of the circumstances and the increase in cyber threats, Britain has decided to place the responsibility squarely on the shoulders of company directors and investors. ”Fear of reputational damage” can be a powerful motivator!
Interestingly, the report suggests that in the main, the British government is wary of the US mandatory approach since it believes companies may risk withholding such information rather than face unwanted public scrutiny.
The topic has stirred up debate among those who prefer the mandatory approach, suggesting that it keeps organisations on their toes.
This pilot scheme is expected to run across a variety of different industry sectors.
http://www.iol.co.za/scitech/technology/security