" Mac "

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KeRanger Ransomware Hits Mac OS X Users

This week Mac users were targeted by what is being called the first fully functional ransomware for Mac OS X.

Over the weekend when Mac users downloaded the long awaited version 2.90 of popular Bit Torrent client Transmission they got a little something extra, a new piece of malware called KeRanger. (more…)

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Panda Antivirus for Mac – Compatible with El Capitan

September 30th saw the launch of El Capitan, Apple’s new operating system for their Mac range. The good news is, Panda Antivirus for Mac is compatible with El Capitan!

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Advantages of Panda Antivirus for Mac

  • Blocks both malware for Mac OS X and malware for Windows.
  • It scans both files and emails.
  • It quarantines infected files.
  • It offers two kinds of scans: a real-time scan that continuously analyses Mac files, and another that performs monthly, on-demand scans.
  • You can even scan iPhones, iPads and iPod touch for malware.

Remember that Apple and its devices aren’t invincible. To avoid any unpleasant surprises such as XcodeGhost, you should consistantly update the operating system, download apps from the official store and use security software.

Learn more about about Panda Antivirus for Mac.

Mac-Viruses

The Reality of Mac Viruses

For years, Mac users have been safe in the knowledge that their platform was relatively protected against malware. A combination of the lower number of users on the platform, less attention from security researchers and fewer exploited security holes in the operating system than Windows, has led to a generally virus and malware free experience. Windows also represents a far larger target than Mac for profit-seeking virus and malware authors, due to their greater market share.

But in quick succession, two new serious vulnerabilities have been discovered in Mac OS X.

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Panda’s 2016 Consumer Solutions Designed for Multiple Devices

Our 2016 solutions are now available in South Africa. Panda Global Protection 2016, Panda Internet Security 2016, Panda Antivirus Pro 2016, Panda Mobile Security 2016, Panda Antivirus for Mac 2016 and Panda Free Antivirus 2016.  

The 2016 range is designed to make the digital world easier and more secure for consumers. It enables users to browse online safely, protects families against inappropriate content and keeps identities and confidential information safe.  The new products offer multi-platform protection – providing security on Windows (including Windows 10 compatibility), Android, Mac and even anti-theft for iPhone and iPad.

Every user may have a different need or use for connectivity and we try to cater for each of these by offering various solutions at different levels. We want users to be able to perform any activity on the internet without worrying about cyber-criminals, malware or inappropriate content.

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Mac gets Panda Antivirus Corporate Edition

–       The new corporate solution protects Mac computers and servers

–       In 2010, 308 vulnerabilities were discovered in Mac OS X, 67% of these were classified highly critical

Global IT vendor Panda Security has announced the launch of Panda Antivirus for Mac Corporate Edition. The new solution, for Mac desktops, laptops and servers, delivers complete protection against all types of malware able to affect Mac OS, Mac OS X, Windows and Linux, protecting users not just against threats designed specifically to target the Apple platform, but also preventing Mac users from transmitting malware for other operating systems.

“Many companies, universities and other organizations now operate with a diverse network topology including Mac servers and workstations operating alongside Windows systems” says Jeremy Matthews, head of Panda’s sub-Saharan operations. “In these environments it is very important not just to protect against specific threats that target Apple platforms, but also against those Windows threats that can be transmitted via Mac and infect all systems.”

Panda Antivirus for Mac protects against all types of threats in near real-time. It can also scan Apple iPhone, iPad and iPod, thereby ensuring that if any of these devices is carrying malware, they won’t infect other similar devices or the Mac computer or server.

It is also designed specifically not to impact performance, as it operates silently taking advantage of available resources or low workloads.

The antivirus scans folders, files and email, detecting and eliminating or blocking all types of threats initially designed for Windows, but which also affect Mac. These threats include Trojans, spyware, keyloggers, adware, hacking tools, botnets, dialers, scareware and other Macro viruses.

2010: A turning point for Mac security

In 2009 some 34 vulnerabilities were detected in Mac OS. This figure rose to 308 in 2010, with 67% of these vulnerabilities classified as highly critical, indicating that any attacker could take remote control of unpatched systems, among other actions.

“2010 has been an intense year for threats” says Luis Corrons, technical director of Panda. “We have collected over 20 million new examples of malware, and the figure continues to rise. Every day our laboratory receives some 63,000 new threats. Regarding Mac, we’ve seen an increase in the number of threats designed specifically for this platform, although there are many more that can affect corporate Mac users: all Office macro viruses, for example. And there are other types of threats which all Mac users are exposed to, such as phishing, or vulnerabilities in popular programs including browsers, PDF readers, etc.”

Price and availability

The solution is available from February 2011 for R208* per license for workstations, servers and the administration console (12 months with full services, for license ranges between 100 and 199 seats).

For more information go to: http://www.pandasecurity.com/enterprise/solutions/mac-corporate-edition

*Price at rate of exchange

 About Panda Security

Founded in 1990, Panda Security is the world’s leading provider of cloud-based security solutions, with products available in more than 23 languages and millions of users located in 195 countries around the World. Panda Security was the first IT security company to harness the power of cloud computing with its Collective Intelligence technology. This innovative security model can automatically analyze and classify thousands of new malware samples every day, guaranteeing corporate customers and home users the most effective protection against Internet threats with minimum impact on system performance. Panda Security has 61 offices throughout the globe with US headquarters in Florida and European headquarters in Spain. In 2006, Jeremy Matthews founded Panda’s local subsidiary in Cape Town, opening the international vendor’s first presence on the African continent.

 For more information about Panda, visit http://www.pandasecurity.com/.

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Top 10 Internet Security Threats and Trends for 2011

–      “Hacktivism” and cyber war: making the headlines in 2011

–      The growth rate of new malware is set to slow down

–      Social engineering and the use of social media to spread encrypted malware

–      More malware for Mac and for 64-bit systems, as well as zero-day exploits

Global IT vendor Panda Security has forecast that there will be few radical innovations in cyber-crime during 2011. “Hacktivism” and cyber-war; more profit-oriented malware, social media, social engineering and malicious codes with the ability to adapt to avoid detection will be the main protagonists in 2011. There will also be an increase in the threats to Mac users, new efforts to attack 64-bit systems and new zero-day exploits.

Luis Corrons, Technical Director of PandaLabs explains: “Once again we have dusted off the crystal ball and this is a summary of what we reckon will be the ten major security trends during 2011”:

  1. Malware creation. Panda has seen a significant growth in the amount of malware in 2010, a constant theme over the last few years. This year, more than 20 million new strains have been created, more than in 2009. At present, Panda’s Collective Intelligence database stores a total of over 60 million classified threats. The actual rate of growth year-on-year however, appears to have peaked: some years ago it was over 100%. In 2010 it was 50%. We will have to wait and see what happens in 2011.
  2. Cyber war. Stuxnet and the Wikileaks cables suggesting the involvement of the Chinese government in the cyber-attacks on Google and other targets have marked a turning point in the history of these conflicts. In cyber-wars, as with other real-world conflicts today, there are no ranks of uniformed troops making it easy to distinguish between one side and another. This is like guerrilla warfare, where it is impossible to discern who is launching the attack or from where. The only thing it is possible to ascertain is the objective. Attacks such as these, albeit more or less sophisticated, are still ongoing, and will no doubt increase during 2011, although many of them will go unnoticed by the general public.
  3. Cyber-protests. Undoubtedly the major new issue in 2010. Cyber-protests, or hacktivism, are all the rage. This new movement was initiated by the Anonymous group and Operation Payback, targeting firstly organizations trying to close the net on Internet piracy, and later in support of Julian Assange, editor-in-chief of Wikileaks. Even users with limited technical know-how can join in the distributed denial of service attacks (DDoS) or spam campaigns. Despite hasty attempts in many countries to pass legislation to counter this type of activity, effectively by criminalizing it, we believe that in 2011 there will be yet more cyber-protests, organized by this group or others that will begin to emerge.
  4. Social engineering. Panda has seen the continued use of social engineering to infect unwary users. In particular, cyber-criminals have found social media sites to be their perfect working environment, as users are even more trusting than with other types of tools, such as email. Throughout 2010 Panda has witnessed various attacks that have used the two most popular social networks – Facebook and Twitter- as a launch pad. In 2011 we fully expect that not only will hackers continue to use these media, but that they will also be used more for distributed attacks. Moreover, BlackHat SEO attacks (indexing and positioning of fake websites in search engines) will also be widely employed throughout 2011, as always, taking advantage of hot topics to reach as many users as possible.
  5. Windows 7 influencing malware development. As we mentioned last year, it will take at least two years before we start to see the proliferation of threats designed specifically for Windows 7. In 2010 we have begun to see a shift in this direction, and we imagine that in 2011 we will continue to see new cases of malware targeting users of this new operating system.
  6. Cell phones. The eternal question: When will malware for cell phones really take off? It would seem that in 2011 there will be new attacks, but still not on a massive scale. Most of the existing threats target devices with Symbian, an operating system which is now on the wane. Of the emerging systems, Panda predicts that the number of threats for Android will increase considerably throughout the year, becoming the number one target for cyber-crooks.
  7. Tablets? The overwhelming dominance of iPad in this terrain will start to be challenged by new competitors entering the market. Nevertheless, save the odd proof-of-concept or experimental attack, we don’t believe that tablet PCs will become a major consideration for the criminal fraternity in 2007.
  8. Mac. Malware for Mac exists, and will continue to exist. And as the market share continues to grow, so the number of threats will grow accordingly. The biggest concern is the number of security holes affecting the Apple operating system. Let’s hope they get ‘patching’ as soon as possible, as hackers are well aware of the possibilities that such vulnerabilities offer for propagating malware.
  9. HTML5. What could come to replace Flash, HTML5, is the perfect target for many types of criminals. The fact it can be run by browsers without any plug-ins makes it even more attractive to find a security hole that can be exploited to attack users regardless of which browser they use. We will see the first attacks in the coming months.
  10. Highly dynamic and encrypted threats. This is something we have already seen over the last two years, and we fully expect this to increase in 2011. There is nothing new about profit-motivated malware, the use of social engineering or silent threats designed to operate without victims realizing. Yet in our anti-malware laboratory we are receiving more and more encrypted, stealth threats designed to connect to a server and update themselves before security companies can detect them. There are also more threats that target specific users, particularly companies, as information stolen from businesses will fetch a higher price on the black market.

“The overall picture is not improving” says Jeremy Matthews, head of Panda’s sub-Saharan operations. “It is true that in 2010 we have seen several major arrests that have hit hard in the world of cyber-crime. Yet this is sadly insufficient when we consider the scale of what we are fighting against. Profits from this black market amount to thousands of millions of dollars, and many criminals operate with impunity thanks to the anonymity of the Internet and numerous legal loopholes”, he concludes.

For more information about Panda, visit http://www.pandasecurity.com/.

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